Shoes to Die For
Why stepping on white tennis shoes should be punishable by death In this society, stepping on one’s shoes
is one of the most disrespectful actions out there Beginning as early as the 1850’s,
white sneakers have made their mark on fashion and lifestyle. From walking through deserts to running businesses,
white shoes are innovative, professional, and comfortable. But with something so crucial in fashion,
we need to bring in law enforcement for protection. Ask yourself, what sense does it make if we
offer protection for ‘figures like our president and government officials, but not for such
an important figure in our fashion world like white tennis shoes? The president and white shoes are both important
to people, so the same punishment should be required if they are disrespected or ended. One punishment I think we can all come to
an agreement on is the death penalty. While sentencing a person to death may seem
a bit extreme for stepping on shoes, is it truly? Being in public and having somebody step on
your white shoes is a rollercoaster of emotions. White shoes hold value and sacred meanings
and professionality, so for them to be violated without punishment and consequence would be
unfair to the owner. Stepping on some, even accidentally, should
at least cost an arm & a leg. They are personal property, meaning whoever
sports the sneakers has the right to press charges (or to not.) Consider someone walking across a prayer mat,
or drinking your holy water. The amount of disrespect for one’s personal
beliefs and how they choose to express them goes against our rights as Americans. So, what separates sacred shoes from this? Just because you personally do not feel the
need to press charges, does not mean no one will. We are all affected differently by various
scenarios based on our roots and how we were brought up. It would be more fair to have the option for
death penalty and choose to decline it, versus not having the choice at all. If you have ever been in such a situation,
you’ll know and understand where I’m coming from. Here, let me give you an example. Just recently, I was at the mall school shopping
and I went into Foot Locker to look for some new heat to put on my feet at school. I came out of the store with some fresh white
Nikes, and at a nearby bench, I decided to put my new shoes on and put the ones I was
wearing, in the shoebox. I wanted to showcase the new shoes. I thought it would be a good idea. But no. Terrible. Awful idea. I put them on and not even a minute later,
someone cut me off and had the audacity to stomp on my new white shoes. You can imagine the fury and anger I had built
up inside of me. I can say, at that time, and even now, I would
feel better if I had the option to end somebody’s life for that horrific and disrespectful (should
be) crime. I’m not only saying this for my own closure,
but for you if you ever encounter such an unfortunate situation. In another view point, not only is this a
disrespectful act, but an aggressive one. Aggravated assault is a crime punishable (depending
on degree) by jail time and/or death. It would be as if someone punched you, making
it not only logical, but almost necessary to call the police. The death penalty has contributed to executing
people such as Ted Bundy, Timothy McVeigh, and Ronnie Lee Gardner, all of which have
been dangers to the public. And that’s exactly what execution is for-
for those who no longer deserve a place on this earth. They say if life gives you lemons, make lemonade;
so if someone steps on your white shoes, you should have the power to end their life. Disrespecting a pair of crisp, new white tennis
shoes, especially if they belong to a figure of authority, must not go unnoticed. Although a seemingly small incident, it could
cause a war if it happens to the wrong person. We must teach civility from the base, and
it is time to save our soles.

Tagged : # #

Dennis Veasley

4 thoughts on “Shoes to Die For: Why stepping on white tennis shoes should be punishable by death”

  1. Sebastian Morales
    Lewis
    English-1st
    8/2/17

    Shoes to Die For
    Why stepping on white tennis shoes should be punishable by death

    In this society, stepping on one’s shoes is one of the most disrespectful actions out there Beginning as early as the 1850’s, white sneakers have made their mark on fashion and lifestyle. From walking through deserts to running businesses, white shoes are innovative, professional, and comfortable. But with something so crucial in fashion, we need to bring in law enforcement for protection. Ask yourself, what sense does it make if we offer protection for ‘figures like our president and government officials, but not for such an important figure in our fashion world like white tennis shoes? The president and white shoes are both important to people, so the same punishment should be required if they are disrespected or ended. One punishment I think we can all come to an agreement on is the death penalty.

    While sentencing a person to death may seem a bit extreme for stepping on shoes, is it truly? Being in public and having somebody step on your white shoes is a rollercoaster of emotions. White shoes hold value and sacred meanings and professionality, so for them to be violated without punishment and consequence would be unfair to the owner. Stepping on some, even accidentally, should at least cost an arm & a leg. They are personal property, meaning whoever sports the sneakers has the right to press charges (or to not.) Consider someone walking across a prayer mat, or drinking your holy water. The amount of disrespect for one’s personal beliefs and how they choose to express them goes against our rights as Americans. So, what separates sacred shoes from this? Just because you personally do not feel the need to press charges, does not mean no one will. We are all affected differently by various scenarios based on our roots and how we were brought up. It would be more fair to have the option for death penalty and choose to decline it, versus not having the choice at all. If you have ever been in such a situation, you’ll know and understand where I’m coming from. Here, let me give you an example. Just recently, I was at the mall school shopping and I went into Foot Locker to look for some new heat to put on my feet at school. I came out of the store with some fresh white Nikes, and at a nearby bench, I decided to put my new shoes on and put the ones I was wearing, in the shoebox. I wanted to showcase the new shoes. I thought it would be a good idea. But no. Terrible. Awful idea. I put them on and not even a minute later, someone cut me off and had the audacity to stomp on my new white shoes. You can imagine the fury and anger I had built up inside of me. I can say, at that time, and even now, I would feel better if I had the option to end somebody’s life for that horrific and disrespectful (should be) crime. I’m not only saying this for my own closure, but for you if you ever encounter such an unfortunate situation.

    In another view point, not only is this a disrespectful act, but an aggressive one. Aggravated assault is a crime punishable (depending on degree) by jail time and/or death. It would be as if someone punched you, making it not only logical, but almost necessary to call the police. The death penalty has contributed to executing people such as Ted Bundy, Timothy McVeigh, and Ronnie Lee Gardner, all of which have been dangers to the public. And that’s exactly what execution is for- for those who no longer deserve a place on this earth.

    They say if life gives you lemons, make lemonade; so if someone steps on your white shoes, you should have the power to end their life. Disrespecting a pair of crisp, new white tennis shoes, especially if they belong to a figure of authority, must not go unnoticed. Although a seemingly small incident, it could cause a war if it happens to the wrong person. We must teach civility from the base, and it is time to save our soles.

    Citations:

    Heinrichs, J. (2017). Thank you for arguing: what Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can teach us about the art of persuasion. New York: Three Rivers Press.

  2. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=thank+you+for+arguing – LINK TO BUY THE BOOK

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