Hello. I’m Michael. Welcome to Oxford Online English. In this video, you can learn about the Cambridge
PET speaking exam, part 4. Hopefully, you’ve already watched previous
video lessons in this series, so you know what to expect. In this lesson, you’ll learn what will happen
in part 4 of the PET speaking test and how to improve your score. What to Expect in Part 4 of the PET Speaking
Exam. So, what should you expect in part 4 of the
speaking exam? Part 4 is very simple. Part 4 of the speaking exam lasts for about
3 minutes; you speak with your partner. The examiner will ask you and your partner
to talk about something connected to the topic you talked about in part three. Remember that in part three, the examiner
shows you a photo, which you describe. For example, if your photos in part 3 showed
people eating food, you could be asked to talk about the food you enjoy eating, or maybe
restaurants you like going to. If your photos in part 3 showed people having
fun with their friends, you could be asked to talk about what you like or don’t like
doing with your friends. An important thing to remember is that the
examiner will normally ask you to discuss two things in this part. Let’s look at an example:
“Your photos showed people in different types of clothes. Now I’d like you to talk together about
the types of clothes you like to wear and when you like to wear them.” You can see that the question has two parts. It is important to remember to talk about
both the types of clothes you like and when you like to wear them. Many people forget to talk about both. Let’s look at another example:
“Your photos showed people shopping. Now I’d like you to talk together about
where you like to shop and who you like to shop with.” Again, you can see this question has two parts. You will have to talk about where you like
to shop and who you like to shop with. You have to speak about both of these questions
in this part. How to begin Part 4. So, how do you start? A good suggestion is to start by asking a
question to your partner. This shows that you understand what the discussion
is about but also gives you more time to think about what you are going to say. Let’s look at an example. The examiner asks you:
“Now, I’d like you to talk together about food you like eating, and where you like to
eat.” You start:
“I like to eat pizza in a restaurant.” Not a great start, is it? It’s very simple and doesn’t feel like
the start of a conversation. Now let’s look at a better way to begin:
“So, what kind of food do you enjoy eating?” This is much better. It shows that you understand the topic and
that you are trying to communicate with your partner. Of course, it gives you some time to think
about what to say next! Let’s look at another example. The examiner asks you:
“Now I’d like you to talk together about the types of clothes you like to wear and
when you like to wear them.” You start:
“I love wearing T-shirts.” This is not a very good way to start. It doesn’t really start the conversation,
does it? Let’s listen to a better way to begin:
“OK, what kind of clothes do you like wearing?” This sounds more like the start of a conversation,
right? This is a much better way to begin. Listen and Respond to Your Partner’s Ideas
It’s important to listen to your partner actively and respond to what he or she says. The examiners want to see a natural conversation
between two people. If your partner says:
“I really enjoy going to Italian restaurants because the food is delicious. Do you like Italian restaurants?” And you reply:
“I really like Indian food because I love spicy food.” Can you see the problem? You didn’t answer your partner’s question. Let’s try again:
“I really enjoy going to Italian restaurants because the food is delicious. Do you like Italian restaurants?” You reply:
“I do like Italian restaurants because I love pizza, but I prefer Indian food because I
love spicy food. Do you like Indian food?” It might look like a small difference, but
it’s very important. This answer is much better. You answered the question, expressed your
opinion and moved the conversation forward by asking a question. Even if your partner doesn’t ask a question,
you should still respond to what they say. Let’s look at an example. Your partner says:
“I love wearing t-shirts and shorts in sunny weather.” You say:
“I like wearing jumpers in cold weather.” This sounds unnatural and strange, doesn’t
it? It sounds like you aren’t listening to your
partner and you’re just taking turns to speak. Let’s see if we can make a better answer. Your partner says:
“I love wearing t-shirts and shorts in sunny weather.” You say:
“I totally agree, t-shirts and shorts are more comfortable in sunny weather. In colder weather I prefer to wear jumpers.” This is much better. Again, you show that you are listening to
your partner, but you also express your own ideas. Moving the Conversation Forward
In part four of the PET speaking exam, you need to talk for three minutes. How can you keep the conversation going? How can you make sure you don’t get stuck
on one topic for too long? You need to control the conversation. A good way to do this is to ask your partner
questions. Especially if your partner goes off topic,
you should ask a question to bring the conversation back to the question the examiner asked. Listen to this example. Student 1: “I love going to the cinema with
my friends.” Student 2: “I like playing tennis with my
friends.” Student 1: “I go to the shopping centre at
the weekend with them.” Student 2: “I play tennis with my friends
on Sunday morning.” This doesn’t sound like a normal conversation,
does it? You should imagine that you are talking to
your friends. It should sound natural and relaxed. Let’s listen again. Student 1: “I love going to the cinema with
my friends. Do you go to the cinema often?” Student 2: “I sometimes go to the cinema if
there’s something I want to see, but actually I prefer playing sport with my friends, especially
tennis. What do you usually do at the weekend?” Student 1: “I usually go to the shopping centre
and hang around with my friends all day. What about you?” Student 2: “That sounds great. I usually play tennis on Sunday mornings and
sometimes I go swimming at the swimming pool.” That sounded a lot more normal, didn’t it? It actually sounded like a real conversation
between friends. Why? Because they asked the right questions to
keep the conversation moving. Let’s look at an example where the students
get stuck on the same thing for too long: Student 1: “My favourite food is chocolate. I love eating anything with chocolate. What do you think?” Student 2: “I agree, chocolate is amazing. I eat chocolate a few times a week. How often do you eat chocolate?” Student 1: “I eat chocolate almost every day. I love having chocolate cake, chocolate crepes,
and chocolate bars. What is your favourite type of chocolate?” Student 2: “I love milk chocolate. What is your favourite type of chocolate?” Sounds boring, right? You don’t want to get stuck on the same
thing. Let’s listen again but this time we are
going to try and control the conversation and move away from chocolate. Student 1: “My favourite food is chocolate. I love eating anything with chocolate. What do you think?” Student 2: “I agree, chocolate is amazing. I eat chocolate a few times a week. How often do you eat it?” Student 1: “I eat chocolate almost every day. Let’s move on. What other food do you like?” Student 2: “I really like Italian food: pizza,
pasta, things like that. Do you like Italian food?” I think we can agree that the second conversation
was much better. The first student moved the conversation along
and changed the topic. You don’t want to get stuck on one thing
for a long time. How to Make Your Answers More Interesting
But what should you actually talk about? It’s a good idea to give your real opinions
and talk about your experiences, your life and your plans. Tell your partner about interesting things
you have done in the past, or plans you have for the future. Making your answers more detailed and interesting
is always a good thing. It will help you to use your English, it will
help you to talk for the full three minutes, and it will help you to communicate with your
partner and have a natural conversation. All of these things can help you to get a
higher score in your PET speaking exam. Let’s look at an example. Your partner asks you:
“What hobbies do you like doing in your free time?” And you say:
“I love playing basketball because it is good sport. I don’t like football because it is a boring
sport.” This answer is OK, but it’s not so interesting,
and the opinions are quite simple. Let’s listen again:
“I really love playing basketball. I played with my friends last weekend. In the future, I’d love to be a professional
basketball player. I don’t like football. I know that quite a lot of people love it
but I think it’s quite dull. What do you think about football?” This answer sounded a lot better, right? The answer was much more interesting and you
spoke about the past and the future showing the examiner that you can use different verb
forms. Let’s look at another example. Your partner asks:
“What clothes do you wear to school?” And you reply:
“I wear a uniform to school. I don’t like wearing a uniform. I prefer wearing other clothes.” This is a very boring answer. You want to give more information and use
a range of language in your answer: different verb forms, adjectives, and so on. Let’s listen again:
“I have to wear a uniform to school. It’s horrible. In the past, I didn’t have to wear one but
I do now. I love getting home from school so I can change
into my normal clothes.” This is a better answer because it uses different
tenses and gives a more detailed personal example. Final review
Okay, we’ve looked at what you can expect in part 4 of your PET speaking exam; let’s
review the key point to remember. Remember to talk about both things the examiner
introduces at the start. It is a good idea to start with a question
to start the discussion. Make sure you listen to your partner and respond
to his or her ideas. Try and control the conversation and make
you aren’t stuck on the same thing for a long time. Ask your partner questions to keep the conversation
moving forward. And lastly, make sure you give lots of opinions
and examples. You want to make your conversation interesting. I hope you now have a good idea of what to
expect in your Cambridge PET speaking exam and how to impress your examiners. Good luck! That’s the end of the lesson. Thanks very much for watching! I hope you found it useful. You can see more of our free lessons on our
website: Oxford Online English dot com. See you next time!

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Dennis Veasley

96 thoughts on “PET (B1 Preliminary) Speaking Exam – How to Do the Cambridge PET Speaking Exam Part Four”

  1. Thank you very much for all the lessons.
    It helped me a lot with my exams . I hope to see more lessons like this.

  2. Iam from India .I would prefer this youtube channel is good for not only our exams even it improves our language.I think I would be the topper in my tomorrow exam

  3. Thank you very much, it was really hopeful, my PET exam is tomorrow so I hope it will go well 🙂

  4. I'm gonna have this exam tomorrow… I used to be nervous but thanks to you I now feel better!! Thanks so much you're the best!!!

  5. That's quite amusing that you guys are commenting this video just before the exam). Maybe it gives some luck. So I'm having pet exam tomorrow too)

  6. You're a good teacher. I really enjoyed the lesson that was very useful and really helpful me with my exam… Thank you for your wonderful lesson..

  7. I'm having my exam tomorrow! You're a great teacher and this video helped me a lot!! Wish me good luck…!🙈

  8. My exam is tomorrow. I love English and I really enjoy speaking it and using it in general, but I'm still really worried because there are other things about these tests that don't depend on your knowledge of the Language: some questions of the reading test, for example, are so tricky that I would maybe get them wrong even in my first Language; or in the speaking test as well… what if I get a photo where there isn't much to describe, or what if I'll be given a topic in part four that isn't very wide and both me and my partner don't really know what to talk about?

  9. I'm doing the PET exam tomorrow,I feel quite nervous. Thank you so much for these lessons,you are helping me so much!

  10. If we ask a question to have time to think about our answer, how could we possibly be active on what our partner says? XD

  11. Hi! Thank you a lot for this lessons about English PET speaking exam. I'll have it tomorrow. You really helped me!

  12. Im presenting my exam tomorrow and I havent felt so nervous in my whole life; but your videos had helped me a lot. THANKS

  13. I'm going to have this exam tomorrow. I'm always worried about part 3 and 4, but now it's much better.
    Thanks for your lessons. It's really helps me a lot.
    Wish me luck please.

  14. Thanks a lot your video was informative .but we must work on ourselves for a long time because we didn't learn all these information in our schools thus we can't think in organized way to use your channel's technique you should invite us to your unique country UK to learn all of these skills …thanks for help

  15. Great work! Been recommending you guys to my students for a few years now. We'll be looking forward to the new videos with tips on how to pass the revised version of Preliminary for 2020. Thank you!

  16. Mañana tengo mi examen 😬😬🥺🥺pero me siento más preparada con esta lecciones 🥰

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