Hong Kong police and protesters exchanged tear gas and petrol bombs as an illegal anti-government march that attracted tens of thousands descended into chaos, with hundreds of shops trashed and Chinese banks and metro stations targeted After two weeks of relative calm, the major rally showed that the pro-democracy campaign has not lost support  Protestors threw petrol bombs at the Tsim Sha Tsui police station on Kowloon peninsula after police inside fired volleys of tear gas to disperse demonstrators on the street Hong Kong police and protesters exchanged tear gas and petrol bombs as an illegal anti-government march that attracted tens of thousands descended into chaos A protester can be seen throwing a tear gas canister back After two weeks of relative calm, the major rally showed that the pro-democracy campaign has not lost support Pictured: Protestors set fire on a street to keep police back As riot police advanced, protestors fell back to their next barricade, unlike past rallies when they stood and clashed with police by throwing petrol bombs and bricks Pictured: Police arrive to chase away protestorsOther black-clad protesters erected fiery barriers on Nathan Road, a major retail strip in the Kowloon district, as scores of riot police with shields marched towards them  Police used several water cannon trucks to disperse protesters, spraying jets of blue dye into the crowds and sending hundreds fleeing Police have used the blue dye to identify protesters.It was the heaviest use of water cannons by police and many people hit with the water developed coughs, suggesting an irritant may be mixed with the water As riot police advanced, protestors fell back to their next barricade, unlike past rallies when they stood and clashed with police by throwing petrol bombs and bricks Black-clad protesters erected fiery barriers in the Kowloon district in a bid to hold back police as scores of riot police with shields marched towards them Police used several water cannon trucks to disperse protesters, spraying jets of blue dye into the crowds and sending hundreds fleeing Police have used the blue dye to identify protesters Pictured: a journalist reacts as the water cannons are used It was the heaviest use of water cannons by police and many people hit with the water developed coughs, suggesting an irritant may be mixed with the water RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next NO laughing matter! 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Hong Kong police and protestors hurl tear gas and petrol Share this article Share Protestors threw petrol bombs at the Tsim Sha Tsui police station on Kowloon peninsula after police inside fired volleys of tear gas to disperse demonstrators on the street One protester hits a tear gas canister with a tennis racket  By nightfall protestors had set fire to numerous road barriers and trashed shops in several Kowloon districtsAlong the march route metro stations were trashed along with hundreds of shops where goods were thrown onto the streets Several Chinese banks were targeted.By nightfall protestors had set fire to numerous road barriers and trashed shops in several Kowloon districts, said police, who continued to engage in street by street skirmishes  Police detonated what they said was an explosive device surrounded by broken bricks that was left in the middle of a street Hong Kong has been battered by months of often massive and violent protests over concerns that Beijing is tightening its grip on the city, the worst political crisis since Britain handed the city back to China in 1997 Along the march route metro stations were trashed along with hundreds of shops A protester can be seen vandalizing a shop Protestors stand on scattered bricks as they clash with police Some pavement bricks were torn up for these clashes  People react to the smoke  Hong Kong has been battered by months of often massive and violent protests A woman protects a child’s eyes from the tear gas The protests are over concerns that Beijing is tightening its grip on the city An anti-government demonstrator is held to the ground during a protest in Hong Kong The demonstrations mark the worst political crisis since Britain handed the city back to China in 1997 Protestors can be seen throwing tear smoke shells at a police station entrance Beijing has denied eroding Hong Kong’s freedoms and Xi has vowed to crush any attempt to split China People walk past graffiti on a bank building vandalized by protestors  Protestors have targeted Chinese banks and shops with links to mainland China Protesters wearing masks march to abolish the anti-mask law in Hong Kong The protests in the city also pose the biggest popular challenge to China’s President Xi Jinping since he took power Mainland Chinese living in Hong Kong have been left worried about their safety Pictured: A protester looks on from a road dividerThe protests in the city also pose the biggest popular challenge to China’s President Xi Jinping since he took power  Beijing has denied eroding Hong Kong’s freedoms and Xi has vowed to crush any attempt to split China The unrest was sparked by a bill that would have allowed extradition to mainland China for trial in Communist Party-controlled courts It has since widened into a pro-democracy movement.Protestors have targeted Chinese banks and shops with links to mainland China, leaving mainland Chinese living in Hong Kong worried about their safety  Police had declared Sunday’s march illegal due to concerns over public safety. Protestors, ranging from young students to the elderly, many carrying umbrellas to shield their faces from street surveillance cameras, face arrest Protestors hold placards that read ‘aligning the regime, anti Communist survival’ Beijing has denied eroding Hong Kong’s freedoms Protestors gather on Nathan Road, a major retail strip in the Kowloon district  Xi has vowed to crush any attempt to split China Police used a water cannon from the top of a truck to chase away protestors  The unrest was sparked by a bill that would have allowed extradition to mainland China for trial in Communist Party-controlled courts The unrest has since widened into a pro-democracy movement Pictured: Protestors run from advancing police in the Tsim Sha Tsui district Police had declared Sunday’s march illegal due to concerns over public safety At the start, the march was peaceful. Pictured: People march along the main road in Mong KokAt the start of the march banners reading ‘Free Hong Kong’ stretched across the ground Other posters read ‘HongKongers Resist’, while graffiti on one wall said ‘Better Dead than Red’ Hardcore protestors, who have staged months of running battles with police, set up road blocks and sprayed graffiti saying: ‘We chose to die on our feet rather than live on our knees!’ Some tore up pavement bricks for clashes with police.Protestors believe the police refusing to issue a permit for Sunday’s march was an attempt to limit their numbers, as some would fear being arrested ‘The government pretends we just want to destroy the city. We’ll be out for as long as it takes to let the world know it is them who are destroying it,’ said Ray, 24, who planned to go home after a few hours as he feared arrest Like most protestors, he did not want to give his full name. A person wearing a Guy Fawkes mask takes part in the pro-democracy march  Hong Kong is governed under a ‘one country, two systems’ formula, which permits the city freedoms not available on the mainland such as an independent judiciary  Protestors, ranging from young students to the elderly, face arrest Pictured: Protesters clutch a banner that reads: ‘President Trump and Xi, let’s meet in Hong Kong’ At the start of the march banners reading ‘Free Hong Kong’ stretched across the ground Other posters read ‘HongKongers Resist’, while graffiti on one wall said ‘Better Dead than Red’ Protestors believe the police’s refusal to issue a permit for Sunday’s march was an attempt to limit their numbers, as some would fear being arrested  Many protestors carried umbrellas to shield their faces from street surveillance cameras Some also wore gas masks to prepare for tear gas Protestors can be seen reacting to tear gas  Hardcore protestors, who have staged months of running battles with police, set up road blocks and sprayed graffiti saying: ‘We chose to die on our feet rather than live on our knees!’ A protester throws a Molotov cocktail inside a Bank of China branch in Hong Kong Protestors are angry at Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam for what they see as her failure to protect freedoms from an encroaching Beijing Police officers remove a barricade during a protest Demonstrators say Carrie Lam is responsible for imposing colonial-era emergency powers and allowing what they say is excessive force by police People with children walk away from the demonstration  Lam’s annual policy address last Wednesday failed to address protestors’ core demands A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister as another clutches a mask to his face  Protestors have five core demands: universal suffrage; an independent inquiry into police action against protestors; amnesty for those charged; an end to describing protestors as rioters and the formal withdrawal of the extradition bill Riot police face barricades on the streets today Lam has said the extradition bill is dead, but it is yet to be formally withdrawnHong Kong is governed under a ‘one country, two systems’ formula, which permits the city freedoms not available on the mainland such as an independent judiciary Protestors are angry at Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam for what they see as her failure to protect those freedoms from an encroaching Beijing, imposing colonial-era emergency powers, and allowing what they say is excessive force by police ‘Carrie Lam is not listening to us at all. This may work in China but not in Hong Kong,’ said Cheung, a 33-year-old woman wearing a face mask and black T-shirt, symbols of the democracy movement Lam’s annual policy address last Wednesday failed to address protestors’ demands. A protestor puts up anti-government posters on a wall Lam has rejected most of the demonstrators’ demands Riot police take aim to disperse crowds of protestors  On Sunday Lam said a police complaints inquiry will be completed before the end of the year A barricade is set on fire in the demonstrations  The Asian financial hub is facing its first recession in a decade because of the unrestProtestors have five core demands: universal suffrage; an independent inquiry into police action against protestors; amnesty for those charged; an end to describing protestors as rioters and the formal withdrawal of the extradition bill Lam has said the bill is dead, but it is yet to be formally withdrawn. She has rejected the other demands On Sunday she said a police complaints inquiry will be completed before the end of the year Two people have been shot and wounded by police and thousands injured since the protests escalated in June Police have arrested more than 2,300 people.The Asian financial hub is facing its first recession in a decade because of the unrest

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Dennis Veasley

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